Take Two shakes up dairy-free segment with new barley milk

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The sustainable plant-based brand uses rejuvenated barley to achieve a nutrient-rich milk alternative
Take Two Foods
Photo as seen on Take Two Foods Facebook page

Take Two Foods, a plant-based drink manufacturer based in Oregon, has announced distribution expansion for its Barley Milk. As well as selling direct to consumer via its website, the brand has secured shelf space at 25 locations, including grocery stores, coffee shops, and cafes across the Pacific Northwest and Los Angeles.

The challenger brand made the announcement three months after its debut in the US market.

“We crafted the first-ever barley milk to satisfy your craving for plant-based milk that tastes, nourishes, and performs like traditional dairy milk,” Take Two Foods said in a statement.

Take Two Foods said that its Barley Milk boasts a creamy, smooth and rich finish, alongside flavour and performance comparable with dairy milk. The product, it claims, is crafted with the highest-quality ingredients.

“Barley Milk contains complete protein, fibre, calcium, and good fats, and it has 50% less sugar than other flavoured plant-based milks,” the company said in a statement.

There are four flavours in the range: original, vanilla, chocolate, and chef’s blend.

Ancient superfood

Barley is an ancient grain and a superfood with countless health benefits, including:

  • Vitamins, minerals and other beneficial plant compounds
  • Soluble fibre, which reduces hunger and enhances feelings of fullness. It may even promote weight loss
  • Promotes a good balance of gut bacteria and supports digestion
  • Helps prevent the formation of gallstones, helping your gallbladder function normally and reducing your risk of surgery
  • Helps to reduce cholesterol levels by preventing its formation and increasing its excretion through the faeces
  • The addition of barley to diets may reduce risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol
  • Whole-grain barley may help improve insulin production and reduce blood sugar levels, both of which may reduce the likelihood of type 2 diabetes
  • Barley is cheap, edible warm or cold and easily added to a variety of savoury and sweet dishes
Take Two Foods barley milk range of flavours
Barley Milk comes in four flavours.
Photo as seen on Take Two Foods’ Facebook page

Upcycled barley milk

Take Two Foods has turned to barley with a sustainable, circular economy approach; it uses rejuvenated barley to achieve a nutrient-rich milk alternative.

Rejuvenated barley comes from spent grain, the by-product of the beer brewing process.

Billions of pounds of spent grain are produced each year by the global beer industry and 95% goes to waste or used to feed livestock. Take Two Foods wants to change that by turning the spent grain into a powerhouse, nutrient-rich plant-based protein.

Sarah Pool, co-founder and chief executive, explained: “Our commitment is to craft the world’s most remarkable plant-based foods made with the highest-quality ingredients while championing the planet’s resources. Food that tastes amazing and truly nourishes, without the environmental impact.”

Matt Olsofsky, co-founder and operations chief, added: “We wanted to bring back the joy and nostalgia of drinking a glass of milk. Our Barley milk does just that.”

Take Two Foods plans to expand its retail and foodservice distribution nationwide by autumn 2020. More information on the company website.

In Europe, Russia’s food processing company Sady Pridonya has also made forays into the plant-based segment with a superfood grain: buckwheat. NutritionInvestor understands the company is set to further expand the range with a similar nutrient-rich grain.

About the author

Murielle Gonzalez
Editor of NutritionInvestor at Investor Publishing | Website

Murielle Gonzalez is the editor of NutritionInvestor. She is an experienced journalist with 20 years in the media industry, including work at b2b magazines in the UK and Latin America. Murielle holds a Master in Journalism from the University of Westminster and flair for all things online and multimedia storytelling.

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